Tuesday, April 15, 2014


The natural world awakes and changes come quickly, one atop the other. The ground continues to thaw, heaving areas where snow cover was shoveled or plowed, allowing frost to penetrate deeply. But soon, all frost will have left and the tortured, frost-heaved landscape will become level once again.

Plants respond to lengthening hours of daylight and warmer temperatures. Now, for those fortunate enough to have a good crop close at hand, is time for to harvest wild evening primrose, Oenothera biennis. The carrot-like, whitish root, with its strawberry-colored crown, is an excellent root vegetable. The foliage, which at this time appears as a basal rosette (leaves radiating out from a central point and spread flat on the ground), makes a fine potherb and the very young, tender leaves add spice to salads.

Dandelions, Taraxacum officinalis, appear on lawns and in gardens. The little first-of-the-year plants are yet too small to bother harvesting, but a week of decent temperatures and some sunshine will change that.

Common chickweed, Stella media, a perennial groundcover that persists over the winter, makes a good vegetable dish now when slightly steamed.

A friend who lives in Freeport writes me, telling of having pulled a number of rootstalks of cattails and taking the white, starch-laden shoots. These work fine rinsed and eaten raw or chopped in salads or even in stir-fry dishes.

There are other wild edible plants available now in addition to those I’ve mentioned here. Suffice it to say, anyone with a good ration of determination could conceivably go out and gather enough wild plants for a meal.

Basal rosette of evening primrose
So it has begun. From now on, the pace will only increase as other plants begin showing. And until next fall’s first killing frost puts an end to our bounty, we foragers have the world by the tail. Here’s to another season. Enjoy.
New shoot of common cattail


  1. I have yet to find an evening primrose. Do they have any lookalikes I need to watch out for? Thanks! -Don from Enfield

  2. Hello Don from Enfield. Sorry I missed your comment and didn't respond earlier. No, evening primrose don't have any look-alikes, so you are safe there. Look for them on waste ground, gravelly banks, edges of dry fields and so on. It helps to find the old stalks from last year. These are about 2-3 feet tall, woody, and will have vase-shaped seedpods, curled back from where they opened and shot out the seeds.
    Good luck in your quest.


  3. Thanks Tom! I went out first thing this morning and found several evening primrose plants. Your description was spot on. - Don